USCIS Glossary

U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) Acronyms and Glossary 

Updated November 2023


You can use this dictionary to quickly look up a definition or explanation for a topic.


Here is a list of some of the most important acronyms used in USCIS immigration:

Please note that this is not an exhaustive list, and there may be other acronyms used in USCIS immigration. It's always a good idea to consult official USCIS resources or seek legal advice for accurate and up-to-date information.

A

A-Number/Alien Registration Number/Alien Number (A-Number or A#)

A unique seven-, eight- or nine-digit number assigned to a noncitizen by the Department of Homeland Security. Also see USCIS Number.


Abroad

Outside the continental United States, Alaska, Hawaii, Puerto Rico, Guam, the U.S. Virgin Islands, and the Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands. See INA 101(a)(38). 

Note that “abroad” includes the U.S. territory of American Samoa. American Samoa is considered as abroad because it is not included in the definition of United States at INA 101(a)(38).

Accommodation

A modification of an existing practice or procedure that will enable an applicant with a disability to participate in the application process.​

Accredited Representative

These are people who are connected to BIA-recognized organizations. These representatives can charge or accept only very small fees for their services. For a list of these BIA-accredited representatives, visit justice.gov/eoir/recognition-accreditationroster-reports.

Acquired citizenship

This is citizenship conferred at birth on children born abroad to a U.S. citizen parent(s).

Adjourn/Adjournment

This is when proceedings have been postponed to another time or location.

Adjudicate/Adjudication

USCIS’ review of a petition or application to determine if a petitioner or applicant is eligible for that immigration benefit .

Adjustment of Status

This is the process that you can use to apply for lawful permanent resident status (also known as applying for a Green Card) when you are present in the United States. This means that you may get a Green Card without having to return to your home country to complete visa processing.

Adjustment to immigrant status

This procedure allows certain noncitizens already in the United States to apply for immigrant status. Noncitizens admitted to the United States in a nonimmigrant, refugee, or parolee category may have their status changed to that of lawful permanent resident if they are eligible to receive an immigrant visa and one is immediately available.

Admissibility

Eligibility of an alien to lawfully enter the United States after inspection and authorization by an immigration officer.

Admission Number or I-94 Number

An 11-digit number found on Form I-94 or Form I-94A Arrival-Departure Record.

Adopted decision

This is a decision from the Administrative Appeals Office (AAO) that binds all USCIS adjudication officers, but has not yet published as a precedent decision.

Advance Parole

Advance parole allows you to travel back to the United States without applying for a visa. A transportation company (such as an airline) can accept an advance parole document instead of a visa as proof that you are authorized to travel to the United States. An advance parole document does not replace your passport. In most cases, you must have your advance parole document before you depart the United States.

Affidavit

This is a document in which a person gives facts, and swears that the facts are true and accurate.

Affidavit of Support

An affidavit of support is a legally enforceable contract, and the sponsor’s responsibility usually lasts until the family member or other individual either becomes a U.S. citizen, or is credited with 40 quarters of work (usually 10 years).

Agricultural worker

As a nonimmigrant class of admission, this is an noncitizen coming temporarily to the United States to perform agricultural labor or services, as defined by the secretary of Labor.

Alien

Any person not a citizen or national of the United States as the term “alien” is defined in section 101(a)(3) of the Immigration and Nationality Act (8 U.S.C. 1101(a)(3)). This term may include a stateless person and is synonymous with “noncitizen” and “foreign national.”

Amerasian (Vietnam)

These are noncitizens born to U.S. citizen fathers in Vietnam after Jan. 1, 1962, and before Jan. 1, 1976. Spouses, children, and parents or guardians may accompany the noncitizen to the United States.

Amerasian Act

Pub. L. 97-359 (Act of 10/22/82) allows certain Amerasian children to immigrate to the United States. To qualify for benefits under this law, an noncitizen must have been born in Cambodia, Korea, Laos, Thailand, or Vietnam after Dec. 31, 1950, and before Oct. 22, 1982, and have been fathered by a U.S. citizen.

Application Support Center

USCIS offices where applicants usually have their biometrics (such as fingerprints, photograph and signature) taken.

Apprehension

This is when U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) arrests a removable noncitizen. Each apprehension of the same noncitizen in a fiscal year is counted separately.

Arranged Marriage

This is a common tradition in many cultures and is not the same as forced marriage. In an arranged marriage, families may play a role in choosing the marriage partner, but both individuals are free to choose whether or not to marry and when to get married. A forced marriage happens when families or others both arrange the marriage and deny the individuals to be married the ultimate choice of whether, when, and whom to marry.

Arrival-Departure Record (Form I-94/I-94A)

The Arrival and Departure Record is the I-94, in either paper or electronic format, issued by a Customs and Border Protection (CBP) officer to foreign visitors entering the United States. As of April 30, 2013, most Arrival and/or Departure records are created electronically upon arrival. For more information, see uscis.gov/i-94information.

Asylee

An alien in the United States or at a port of entry who is unable or unwilling to return to his or her country of nationality, or to seek the protection of that country because of persecution or a well-founded fear of persecution. Persecution or the fear thereof must be based on religion, nationality, membership in a particular social group or political opinion.

Attorney of record

This is an attorney who has properly filed a Form G-28 in a particular case and is held responsible as an attorney for the respondent.

Au Pair Program

A Department of State J-1 cultural exchange program that provides exchange visitors between 18 and 26 years old the chance to participate in the home life of a U.S. host family. All au pair participants provide child care services to the host family and attend a U.S. post-secondary educational institution.

Authorized Provider

This is someone who is authorized by the Department of Justice (DOJ)'s Office of Legal Access Programs (OLAP) to provide immigration services to the public. DOJ-recognized organizations and accredited representatives provide essential support to USCIS and the public. They provide educational materials and legal services to help immigrants navigate the immigration system. Authorized providers can help clients prepare forms and are also allowed to attend USCIS interviews with their clients. 

B

Beneficiary

An alien who is sponsored by a relative or a business, or has self-petitioned for an immigration benefit. A “principal beneficiary” is a alien who is named on an immigrant or nonimmigrant petition or application. A “derivative beneficiary” is an immediate family member of the principal beneficiary who may be eligible to receive the same immigration status as the principal beneficiary based on their family relationship.

BIA

This is an abbreviation for the Board of Immigration Appeals.

Biometrics

The processes used to identify people based on their physical traits, including fingerprints, photograph and signature.

Blanket waiver

A waiver issued by USCIS that means the applicant does not have to file a form or pay a fee. Find a detailed explanation of blanket waivers related to specific categories in each volume of the USCIS Policy Manual.

Board of Immigration Appeals

The part of the Executive Office for Immigration Review that is authorized to review most decisions of immigration judges and some types of decisions of Department of Homeland Security officers.

Bond

The amount of money set by the Department of Homeland Security or an immigration judge as a condition to release a person from detention for an immigration court hearing at a later date.

Bond proceedings

This is an immigration court hearing on a request to redetermine a bond set by the Department of Homeland Security. Bond proceedings are separate from other immigration court proceedings.

Border crosser

This is:

Burden of proof

The obligation of a party to establish a fact by presenting evidence in support of that fact. 

Business nonimmigrant

This is an noncitizen coming temporarily to the United States to engage in commercial transactions which do not involve gainful employment in the United States (for example, those engaged in international commerce on behalf of a foreign firm, who are not employed in the U.S. labor market, and who receive no salary from U.S. sources).

C

Cap-Gap Extension

Allows foreign students requesting to change to H-1B status to extend their status and employment authorization through Sept. 30 of the calendar year for which the H-1B petition is being filed, but only if the employment start date in H-1B status will begin on Oct. 1.The extension is automatically terminated if the petition is rejected, denied or revoked.

Carrier Documentation

Carrier documentation allows an airline or other transportation carrier to board permanent residents who have temporarily been outside the United States and whose Green Card or re-entry permit has been lost, stolen, or destroyed.  

Casual domestic employment

Sporadic, irregular or intermittent domestic service a person provides in a private home.

CBP

An abbreviation for U.S. Customs and Border Protection, an agency within the Department of Homeland Security.

Certificate of Citizenship

This is an identity document proving U.S. citizenship. Certificates of Citizenship are issued to derivative citizens and those who acquired U.S. citizenship (see definitions for Acquired citizenship and Derivative Citizenship).

Certificate of Eligibility for Exchange Visitor (J-1) Status (Form DS-2019)

A Department of State-controlled document required to support an application for an exchange visitor visa (J-1) prepared by the program sponsor, which can only be produced through the Student and Exchange Visitor Information System (SEVIS).

Certificate of Eligibility for Nonimmigrant (F-1) Student Status

For Academic and Language School (Form I-20) – A Department of Homeland Security-controlled document required to support an application for a student visa (F-1 or M-1) prepared by the sponsoring school, which can only be produced through the Student and Exchange Visitor Information System (SEVIS).

Certificate of Naturalization

A certificate given at the oath ceremony. It serves as evidence of your citizenship. 

Certificate of translation

This is a translator’s formal statement showing they have accurately translated a foreign language document into English

CFR

Code of Federal Regulations abbreviation.

Child

The INA provides two different definitions of “child.” One definition of child applies to immigration petitions and lawful permanent resident applications. The other definition of child applies to citizenship and naturalization.

One significant difference between the two definitions of child is that a stepchild is not included in the definition relating to citizenship and naturalization. Although a stepchild may be the stepparent’s “child” for purposes of visa issuance or adjustment of status, the stepchild is not the stepparent’s “child” for purposes of citizenship and naturalization. A stepchild is ineligible for citizenship or naturalization through their U.S. citizen stepparent unless the stepchild is adopted and the adoption meets certain requirements.

Definition for Purposes of Immigration Petitions and Lawful Permanent Residence Applications

Generally, for purposes of immigration petitions and lawful permanent residence (Green Card) applications, a child is an unmarried person under 21 years of age who is:

Definition for Purposes of Citizenship and Naturalization

For the definition of a child for purposes of citizenship and naturalization, please refer to the USCIS Policy Manual, Volume 12, Citizenship and Naturalization, Part H, Children of U.S. Citizens, Chapter 2, Definition of Child and Residence for Citizenship and Naturalization, Section A, Definition of Child [12 USCIS-PM H.2(A)].

Civil Surgeon

A medically trained and licensed physician having no less than 4 years’ experience who is designated by USCIS to perform immigration medical exams in a state where the physician is licensed and practicing medicine. For medical examinations performed abroad, please see panel physician

IMPORTANT: Medical examinations will not be recognized if they are given by a doctor in the U.S. who is not a civil surgeon. Please make sure that your appointment is with a civil surgeon, or your results and documents will be invalid.

Code of Federal Regulations

Federal departments and agencies issue regulations to interpret and implement the general provisions of laws enacted by Congress. These regulations apply the law to daily situations. Once regulations are published in the Federal Register, they are collected and published in the Code of Federal Regulations, commonly known as the CFR. The CFR is arranged by subject heading and in general follows the structure of the United States Code.

Conditional resident

Any alien granted permanent resident status on a conditional basis (for example, a spouse of a U.S. citizen or an immigrant investor) who must petition to remove the conditions of their status before the second anniversary of the approval date of their conditional status.

Continuing Approval

H-1B petitions with anything other than “New employment” or “New concurrent employment” selected on Part 2, Question 2 of the Form I-129, whose first decision is an approval. This includes, for example, continuing employment, change of employer, and amended petitions.

Continuing Denial

H-1B petitions with anything other than “New employment” or “New concurrent employment” selected on Part 2, Question 2 of the Form I-129 whose first decision is a denial. This includes, for example, continuing employment, change of employer, and amended petitions.

Continuous residence

The length of time a person has maintained a permanent home in the United States after being admitted as a lawful permanent resident. See the Policy Manual for more information.

Country of -

Crewman

This is an noncitizen serving in a capacity required for normal operations and service on board a vessel or aircraft. Crewmen are admitted for 29 days with no extensions. The INA defines two categories of crewmen: D-1, departing from the United States with the vessel or aircraft on which they arrived, or some other vessel or aircraft; and D-2, departing from Guam with the vessel on which they arrived.

Cuban/Haitian Entrant

Status accorded 1) Cubans who entered illegally or were paroled into the United States between April 15, 1980, and October 10, 1980, and 2) Haitians who entered illegally or were paroled into the country before January 1, 1981. Cubans and Haitians meeting these criteria who have continuously resided in the United States since before January 1, 1982, and who were known to Immigration before that date, may adjust to permanent residence under a provision of the Immigration Control and Reform Act of 1986.

Curricular Practical Training

A program that allows students to accept paid alternative work or study, internships, cooperative education, or any other type of required internship or practicum that employers offer though cooperative agreements with the school.

Cut-off Date

The date the U.S. Department of State uses to determine whether a preference immigrant visa applicant can be scheduled for an immigrant visa interview in any given month. When “C” (meaning Current) is listed instead of a specific date, that means all priority dates are eligible for processing. The cut-off date is the priority date of the first applicant who could not be scheduled for a visa interview for a given month. Applicants with a priority date earlier than the cut-off date can be scheduled. However, if your priority date is on or later than the cut-off date, you will need to wait until your priority date is reached (becomes current). 

D

DACA

Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals, a program launched in 2012. For more information, go to the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals 2017 Announcement page.

Declaration under penalty of perjury

This is a person’s statement saying the information they have provided is true. For example, a declaration may list the facts and then state, “l declare under penalty of perjury (under the laws of the United States of America) that the foregoing is true and correct.”

Defensive Asylum Application

This is an asylum application filed with an immigration judge during removal proceedings in immigration court as a defense against removal from the United States. Immigration courts are part of the Executive Office for Immigration Review (EOIR).

Deferred action

A type of prosecutorial discretion that allows an individual to remain in the United States for a set period of time, unless the deferred action is terminated for some reason. Deferred action is determined on a case-by-case basis and only establishes lawful presence. It does not provide immigration status or benefits of any kind. DACA is one type of deferred action.

 

Deferred Enforced Departure (DED)

The president may authorize DED as part of his power to conduct foreign relations and is not a specific immigration status. Individuals covered by DED are not subject to removal from the United States, usually for a designated period of time. 

Denial

Denial (as compared to reject) – When USCIS notifies applicants or petitioners that the benefit will not be granted, or that they have not shown they are eligible for the benefit they have requested.

Department of Homeland Security

Department of the executive branch of the U.S. government charged with homeland security. This includes:

Department of Justice

Department of the executive branch of the U.S. government with the primary responsibilities to:

Department of Labor

Department of the Executive Branch of the U.S. government that fosters and promotes the welfare of the job seekers, wage earners, and retirees of the United States by improving their working conditions, advancing their opportunities for profitable employment, protecting their retirement and health care benefits, helping employers find workers, strengthening free collective bargaining, and tracking changes in employment, prices, and other national economic measurements. In carrying out this mission, the Department administers a variety of Federal labor laws including those that guarantee workers’ rights to safe and healthful working conditions; a minimum hourly wage and overtime pay; freedom from employment discrimination; unemployment insurance; and other income support.

Deportable noncitizen

This is a noncitizen who has been admitted into the United States subject to any grounds of removal specified in the Immigration and Nationality Act. This includes any noncitizen illegally in the United States, regardless of whether they entered the country by fraud or misrepresentation or entered legally but subsequently violated the terms of their nonimmigrant classification or status.

Deportation

This is the formal removal of an noncitizen from the United States when they have been found removable for violating the immigration laws. An immigration judge orders deportation without imposing or contemplating any punishment. Before April 1997, deportation and exclusion were separate removal procedures. The Illegal Immigration Reform and Immigrant Responsibility Act of 1996 consolidated these procedures. After April 1, 1997, noncitizens in and admitted to the United States may be subject to removal based on deportability. Now called “removal,” this function is managed by U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement.

Derivative Citizenship

Citizenship conveyed to children through the naturalization of their parents or, under certain circumstances, to foreign-born children adopted by U.S. citizen parents, provided certain conditions are met.

Derivatives

This is the primary applicant’s spouse and/or children who will obtain status from the primary applicant.

Designated School Official (DSO)

The person designated by the head of a Student and Exchange Visitor Program (SEVP)-approved school to support the principal designated school official and maintain records in the Student and Exchange Visitor Information System (SEVIS).

Detained/Detention

When a person is held in the custody of an agency in a prison or similar place.

DHS

An abbreviation for the Department of Homeland Security.

Directorates and Program Offices

Groups of offices within USCIS that perform certain tasks to fulfill the USCIS mission.

Disabilities, Employees/Individuals with

Individuals who have physical or mental impairments that substantially limit one or more of their major life activities, have a record of such impairments, or are regarded as having such impairments.

Disaster Relief

See Special Situations

Discretion

USCIS’ ability to decide the outcome of a request by weighing positive and negative factors in the applicant’s case, based on the facts and circumstances the applicant describes in the benefit application.

Discrimination

Unfair treatment in the workplace because of your race, color, religion, sex (including pregnancy), citizenship or immigration status, national origin, disability, age (age 40 or older) or genetic information.

Diversity

This category of immigrants replaces the earlier categories for nationals of underrepresented countries and countries adversely affected by the Immigration and Nationality Act Amendments of 1965 (Pub. L. 89-236). The annual limit on diversity immigration was 40,000 during fiscal years 1992-94, under a transitional diversity program, and 55,000 beginning in fiscal year 1995, under a permanent diversity program.

Docket control

This is the DHS mechanism for tracking the case status of potentially removable noncitizens.

DOJ

An abbreviation for the U.S. Department of Justice.

DOL

An abbreviation for the U.S. Department of Labor.

Domestic worker

Individuals who perform child care, household tasks, or upkeep of a home or surrounding yard on a regular basis in return for wages or other benefits, and who are not independent contractors or providing services on a sporadic basis or for independent contractors or separate businesses.

DS-2019

See Certificate of Eligibility for Exchange Visitor (J-1) Status.

Duration of Status (D/S)

Notation on certain nonimmigrant Forms I-94 indicating that a person, such as an F-1 nonimmigrant student, is authorized to remain in the United States as long as they maintain a valid status.

E

E-Verify

E-Verify is a web-based system that allows enrolled employers to confirm the eligibility of their employees to work in the United States. E-Verify electronically compares information from an employee’s Form I-9, Employment Eligibility Verification, against government records, including the Social Security Administration (SSA) and the Department of Homeland Security (DHS).

EB-5 Immigrant Investor

The Immigrant Investor Program, also known as the Regional Center Program, sets aside EB-5 visas for participants who invest in commercial enterprises based on proposals for promoting economic growth.

EEOC

An abbreviation for the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission.

Employee

A person who provides services or labor for an employer for wages or other remuneration (does not include an independent contractor or those engaged in casual domestic employment).

Employer

A person or entity, including an agent or anyone acting directly or indirectly in this interest, who engages the services or labor of an employee for wages or other remuneration to perform work in the United States. The term employer includes agricultural recruiters and referrers for a fee. In the case of an independent contractor or contract labor or services, the term employer means the independent contractor or contractor and not the person or entity using the contract labor.

Employer sanctions

A series of civil fines or criminal penalties for violating regulations that prohibit employers from hiring, recruiting or referring for a fee aliens known to be unauthorized to work in the United States, or continuing to employ aliens knowing they are unauthorized, or hiring an individual without completing Form I-9.

Employment

Any service or labor performed by an employee for an employer within the United States, not including casual domestic employment or duties performed by nonimmigrant crewmen (D-1 or D-2).

Employment Authorization Document (Form I-766/EAD)

A general term used to describe a card USCIS issues on Form I-766, Employment Authorization Card, to aliens who are authorized to work in the United States. The card contains a photograph of the individual and sometimes his or her fingerprint. An alien who has an EAD usually has open-market employment authorization, but there are exceptions.

Enrolled MOUs

An employer who has enrolled in E-Verify and has agreed to the terms of the Memorandum of Understanding (MOU).

EOIR

This is an abbreviation for the Executive Office for Immigration Review.

Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC)

Agency that enforces federal laws that prohibit discrimination against a job applicant or employee because of race, color, religion, sex (including pregnancy), national origin, age (40 or older), disability or genetic information.

Exchange visitor

An alien admitted temporarily to the United States in J-1 status as a participant in a program approved by the secretary of state for the purpose of teaching, instructing, lecturing, studying, observing, conducting research, consulting, demonstrating special skills or receiving training.

Executive Action

Executive actions have the same effect as a law, but are not subject to the legislative process.

These include presidential proclamations, presidential directives, executive orders, and presidential memoranda.

Executive Office for Immigration Review

This is the part of the Department of Justice that is responsible for immigration courts and the Board of Immigration Appeals.


F

F-1 Nonimmigrant Student

A person who has been admitted to the United States as a full-time academic student at an accredited college, university, seminary, conservatory, academic high school, elementary school or other academic institution, or in a language training program. The student must be enrolled in a program or course of study that culminates in a degree, diploma or certificate, and the school must be authorized by the U.S. government to accept international students.

Female Genital Mutilation or Cutting (FGM/C)

FGM/C refers to cutting and other procedures that injure female genital organs for non-medical reasons. The U.S. government opposes FGM/C, no matter the type, degree, or severity, and no matter what the motivation for performing it. The U.S. government considers FGM/C to be a serious human rights abuse, gender-based violence, and, when done to children, a form of child abuse.

Field office

Offices within a USCIS district that provide services and enforcement functions for a particular portion of the district.

Files Control Office

This refers to a USCIS district office or a sub-office of that district that maintains and controls noncitizen files, commonly called A-Files.

Fiscal year

This is the 12-month period that begins on Oct. 1 of one year and ends on Sept. 30 of the following year.

FOIA

This is an abbreviation for the Freedom of Information Act.

Forced Marriage

This is a marriage that takes place without the consent of one or both people in the marriage. Consent means that you have given your full, free, and informed agreement to marry your intended spouse and to the timing of the marriage. Forced marriage may occur when family members or others use physical or emotional abuse, threats, or deception to force you to marry without your consent. 

Victims of forced marriage may be girls, boys, women, or men. Forced marriage can affect individuals of any race, ethnicity, religion, gender, age, or national origin, from all economic and educational backgrounds.

Foreign government official

As a nonimmigrant class of admission, this is an noncitizen (and their spouses and unmarried minor (or dependent) children) who comes temporarily to the United States who has been accredited by a foreign government to function as an:

Foreign information media representative

As a nonimmigrant class of admission, this is an noncitizen coming temporarily to the United States as a bona fide representative of foreign press, radio, film, or other foreign information media, and their spouse and unmarried minor (or dependent) children.

Foreign National

A person without U.S. citizenship or nationality (may include a stateless person). This term is synonymous with “noncitizen” and with “alien” as defined in section 101(a)(3) of the Immigration and Nationality Act (8 U.S.C. 1101(a)(3)).

Foreign State of Chargeability

See country of - chargeability.

Foreign Student

Either:

F-1 Nonimmigrant Student — An alien who has been admitted to the United States as a full-time academic student at an accredited college, university, seminary, conservatory, academic high school, elementary school or other academic institution, or in a language training program. The student must be enrolled in a program or course of study that culminates in a degree, diploma, or certificate and the school must be authorized by the U.S. government to accept international students; or

M-1 Nonimmigrant Student — A alien who has been admitted to the United States to participate in vocational or other nonacademic programs, other than language training.

Freedom of Information Act

The Freedom of Information Act (FOIA) is a federal statute that:


G

Geographic area of chargeability

This refers to the five regions that the world is divided into—Africa, East Asia, Latin America and the Caribbean, Near East and South Asia, and the former Soviet Union and Eastern Europe—for the initial admission of refugees to the United States.

Green Card

Also known as a Permanent Resident Card, Form I-551, or alien registration card. USCIS issues Green Cards to aliens as evidence of their lawful permanent resident status in the United States. For Form I-9, it is acceptable as proof of identity and employment authorization. Although some Green Cards do not have an expiration date, most are valid for 10 years. Cards issued to individuals with conditional permanent resident status are valid for two years.

H

Hemispheric ceilings

These were statutory limits on immigration to the United States in effect from 1968 to October 1978.

Hire

The actual commencement of employment of an employee for wages or other remuneration.

Hiring Sites

Locations associated with an MOU where employees are hired.

Human Trafficking

Human trafficking, also known as trafficking in persons, is a form of modern-day slavery where traffickers lure individuals with false promises of employment and a better life.

Humanitarian Parole

 Individuals who are outside of the United States may be able to request parole into the United States based on humanitarian or significant public benefit reasons. See Parole.

I

I-20

See certificate of eligibility for nonimmigrant (F-1) student status – For Academic and Language School.

I-94

See arrival-departure record.

ICE

An abbreviation for U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement, an agency of the Department of Homeland Security.

IER

An abbreviation for the Immigrant and Employee Rights Section.

Immediate Relative

Immediate relatives include:

The spouses of U.S. citizens,

The children (unmarried and under 21 years of age) of U.S. citizens,

The parents of U.S. citizens at least 21 years old, and

Widows or widowers of U.S. citizens if the U.S. citizen filed a petition before his or her death or if the widow(er) files a petition within 2 years of the citizen’s death.

Immigrant and Employee Rights Section (IER)

A section within the Civil Rights Division of the Department of Justice that enforces the anti-discrimination provisions of the Immigration and Nationality Act (8 U.S.C. § 1324b). This office protects U.S. citizens and employment-authorized individuals from employment discrimination based on citizenship, immigration status or national origin, with respect to hiring, firing and recruitment or referral for a fee, and discrimination during the employment verification process.

Immigration Act of 1990

Public Law 101-649 (Act of November 29, 1990), which increased the limits on legal immigration to the United States, revised all grounds for exclusion and deportation, authorized temporary protected status to aliens of designated countries, revised and established new nonimmigrant admission categories, revised and extended the Visa Waiver Pilot Program, and revised naturalization authority and requirements.

Immigration and Nationality Act

An act of Congress that, along with other immigration laws, treaties and conventions of the United States, relates to the immigration, temporary admission, naturalization and removal of aliens.

Immigration judge

This is an attorney appointed by the Attorney General to act as an administrative judge within the Executive Office for Immigration Review. They are qualified to conduct specified classes of proceedings, including removal proceedings.

Immigration Marriage Fraud Amendments of 1986

This is Pub. L. 99-639 (Act of 11/10/86), which was passed to deter immigration-related marriage fraud. Its major provision stipulates that noncitizens deriving their immigrant status based on a marriage of less than two years are conditional immigrants. To remove their conditional status they must apply at a USCIS office during the 90-day period before their second anniversary of receiving conditional status. If they cannot show their marriage was and is a valid one, we may terminate their conditional immigrant status and they may become deportable.

Immigration Reform and Control Act of 1986 (IRCA),Public Law 99-603, 100 Stat. 3359 (enacted November 6, 1986)

An act of Congress passed into law to control and deter illegal immigration to the United States. Its major provisions stipulate legalization of undocumented aliens who had been continuously unlawfully present since 1982, legalization of certain agricultural workers, sanctions for employers who knowingly hire undocumented workers and increased enforcement at U.S. borders.

Immigration Scams

Immigration scams are fraudulent or deceptive practices that target immigrants.

Common immigration scams include Temporary Protected Status re-registration, the visa lottery, and “notarios públicos.”

INA

An abbreviation for the Immigration and Nationality Act.

Inadmissibility

Not being allowed to lawfully enter the United States or obtain a visa abroad based on acts or conduct that is listed as an inadmissibility ground in section 212 of the Immigration and Nationality Act.

Inadmissible

This is an noncitizen seeking admission at a port of entry who does not meet the criteria in the INA for admission. The noncitizen may be placed in removal proceedings or, under certain circumstances, allowed to withdraw their application for admission.

Individual

A human being (does not include a non-human entity that is treated as a person for limited legal purposes, unless otherwise specified). This term is synonymous with “person” when it is used to describe a human being. The term may also refer to a characteristic of a single person, thing, or one particular member of a class or group.

Initial Approval

H-1B petitions with “New employment” or “New concurrent employment” selected on Part 2, Question 2 of the Form I-129 whose first decision is an approval.

Initial Denial

H-1B petitions with “New employment” or “New concurrent employment” selected on Part 2, Question 2 of the Form I-129 whose first decision is a denial.

INS

An abbreviation for the Immigration and Naturalization Service, which was abolished in 2003. Its functions are now performed by three agencies of the Department of Homeland Security: U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services, U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement and U.S. Customs and Border Protection.

Intermittent

Something that comes and goes in intervals.

IRCA

An abbreviation for the Immigration Reform and Control Act of 1986, Public Law 99-603, 100 Stat. 3359 (enacted Nov. 6, 1986).

Irregular

An occurrence or activity that lacks in continuity or regularity.

IRS

The Internal Revenue Service is the nation's tax collection agency and administers the Internal Revenue Code enacted by Congress. (www.irs.gov)

J

Jurisdiction

The government’s authority to govern or enforce laws or to enforce them in a certain area or over certain people.

K

L

L-1A Nonimmigrant Classification

This classification enables:
•    A U.S. employer to transfer an executive or manager from one of its affiliated foreign offices to one of its offices in the United States; and
•    A foreign company which does not yet have an affiliated U.S. office to send an executive or manager to the United States with the purpose of establishing one.

Labor certification

A Department of Labor certification required for U.S. employers seeking to employ individuals whose immigration to the United States is based on job skills or nonimmigrant temporary workers coming to perform services for which qualified authorized workers are unavailable in the United States.

Labor certification is issued by the secretary of labor and contains attestations by U.S. employers of the numbers of U.S. workers available to undertake the employment sought by an applicant, and the effect of the alien’s employment on the wages and working conditions of U.S. workers similarly employed. Determination of labor availability in the United States is made at the time of a visa application and at the location where the applicant wishes to work.

Last name

Family name or surname.

Lawful Permanent Resident

Any person not a citizen of the United States who is living in the U.S. under legally recognized and lawfully recorded permanent residence as an immigrant. Also known as “permanent resident alien,” “resident alien permit holder,” and “Green Card holder.”

Legalization dependents

This refers to the maximum of 55,000 visas that were issued to spouses and children of noncitizens legalized under the provisions of the Immigration Reform and Control Act of 1986 (IRCA),Public Law 99-603, 100 Stat. 3359 (enacted November 6, 1986) in each of fiscal years 1992-94.

Legalized aliens

These are certain illegal noncitizens who are eligible to apply for temporary resident status under the legalization provision of the Immigration Reform and Control Act of 1986.

LIFE

This is an abbreviation for Legal Immigration and Family Equity Act.

Lodging

This occurs when an immigration court clerk stamps a complete asylum application as “lodged not filed” at an immigration court window before the application is filed with an immigration judge at an immigration hearing.

EOIR uses the date the immigration judge accepts the application at a hearing as the date it is “filed.” However, we use the date the asylum application was stamped “lodged not filed” as an application filing date for purposes of calculating the 180-day asylum EAD clock.

LPR

An abbreviation for lawful permanent resident.

M

Maiden name

A woman’s last name or family name at birth, before she married.

Mailing Address

The address where you would like to receive written correspondence from USCIS.

Medical waiver

A medical waiver allows an immigration applicant to be admitted into, or remain in the United States despite having a health condition identified as grounds of inadmissibility. Terms and conditions can be applied to a medical waiver on a case-by-case basis.

Middle initial

The first letter of the second given name.

Migrant

A person who leaves their country of origin to seek residence in another country.

N

NACARA

This is an acronym for the Nicaraguan Adjustment and Central American Relief Act

NAICS

This is the North American Industry Classification System Code:  A character string that refers to an industry classification within the North American Industry Classification System.

National of the United States

A person who, though not a citizen of the United States, owes permanent allegiance to the United States (for example, persons born in American Samoa or Swains Island).

NATO official

As a nonimmigrant class of admission, this is an noncitizen coming temporarily to the United States as a member of the armed forces or as a civilian employed by the armed forces on assignment with a foreign government signatory to NATO (North Atlantic Treaty Organization), and the noncitizen’s spouse and unmarried minor (or dependent) children.

Naturalization

The manner in which a person not born in the United States voluntarily becomes a U.S. citizen.

Naturalization Certificate

We issue this certificate to a person who becomes a U.S. citizen through the naturalization process after their 18th birthday.

Next Friend

A person who appears in a lawsuit to act for the benefit of an alien who is under the age of 16, or is incapacitated or incompetent, who has suffered substantial physical or mental abuse as a result of being a victim of qualifying criminal activity. The next friend is not a party to the legal proceeding and is not appointed as a guardian.

 

Noncitizen

A person without U.S. citizenship or nationality (may include a stateless person). This term is synonymous with “foreign national” and with “alien” as defined in section 101(a)(3) of the Immigration and Nationality Act (8 U.S.C. 1101(a)(3)).

Nonimmigrant

An alien who is admitted to the United States for a specific temporary period of time. There are clear conditions on their stay. There are a large variety of nonimmigrant categories, and each exists for a specific purpose and has specific terms and conditions. Nonimmigrant classifications include:

Most nonimmigrants can be accompanied or joined by spouses and unmarried minor (or dependent) children.

Nonpreference category

Nonpreference visas were available to qualified applicants not entitled to a visa under the preferences until the category was eliminated by the Immigration Act of 1990.

North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA)

Public Law 103-182 (Act of Dec. 8, 1993), created special economic and trade relationships for the United States, Canada and Mexico. The TN nonimmigrant classification allows qualified Canadian and Mexican citizens to seek temporary entry into the United States to engage in business activities at a professional level. Accountants, engineers, lawyers, pharmacists, scientists and teachers fall into this category.

Notary Public

In many Latin American countries, the term “notario público” (which is Spanish for “notary public”) means something very different than what it means in the United States. In many Spanish-speaking nations, “notarios” are powerful attorneys with special legal credentials. In the U.S., however, notary publics are people appointed by state governments to witness the signing of important documents and administer oaths. A notario público is not authorized to provide you with any legal services related to immigration. Only an attorney or an accredited representative working for a Department of Justice (DOJ)-recognized organization can give you legal advice.

Number

Number as in A-Number, please see the A-Number/Alien Registration Number/Alien Number (A-Number or A#) entry.

Numerical limit, exempt from

Lawful permanent residents who are exempt from the provisions of the flexible numerical limit of 675,000 set by the Immigration Act of 1990.

Nursing Relief Act of 1989

Pub. L. 101-238 (Act of 12/18/89) allows certain nonimmigrants to adjust to permanent resident status if:

O

Occupation

For an noncitizen entering the United States or adjusting without a labor certification, occupation refers to the employment held in the country of last legal residence or in the United States. For an noncitizen with a labor certification, occupation is the employment for which certification has been issued.

Ombudsman

The Office of Citizenship and Immigration Services Ombudsman is an impartial resource that makes recommendations to us on how to improve services, increase efficiencies, and provide a more meaningful experience. We take these recommendations seriously, review them thoroughly, and, where possible, implement them.

P

Panama Canal Act Immigrants

These are special immigrants that fall into one of three categories established by Pub. L. 96-70 (Act of 9/27/79):

Panel Physician

A medically trained, licensed and experienced doctor practicing overseas who is appointed by the local U.S. Embassy or Consulate. These medical professionals receive U.S. immigration-focused training to provide examinations as required by the Center for Disease Control and Prevention and U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services. For medical examinations given in the U.S., please see civil surgeon.

IMPORTANT: Please make sure that your appointment is with a civil surgeon or your results and documents will be invalid.

 

Parole

The discretionary decision that allows inadmissible aliens to leave an inspection facility freely so that, although they are not admitted to the United States, they are permitted to be physically present in the United States. Parole is granted on a case-by-case basis for urgent humanitarian reasons or significant public benefit. Parole is not an “admission” or “entry.” The paroled alien is treated as an applicant for admission. Parole falls under INA section 212(d)(5)(A).

Parole in place

Discretion that allows aliens who are already physically present in the U.S. without inspection or admission an opportunity to stay in U.S. for urgent humanitarian reasons or significant public benefit. Parole in place falls under INA section 212(d)(5)(A).

Parolee

This is an individual who is paroled into the United States. See Parole.

Pattern or Practice

Regular, repeated and intentional acts, but does not include isolated, sporadic or accidental acts.

Pay

Wages or other remuneration.

Per country limit

This is the maximum number of family-sponsored and employment-based preference visas that we can issue to citizens of any country in a fiscal year. We calculate the limits each fiscal year depending on the total number of family-sponsored and employment-based visas available. We cannot issue more than 7% of visas to natives of any one independent country in a fiscal year, and we cannot issue more than 2% of visas to any one dependency of any independent country. The per-country limit does not indicate, however, that a country is entitled to the maximum number of visas each year, just that it cannot receive more than that number. Because of the combined workings of the preference system and per-country limits, most countries do not reach this level of visa issuance.

Permanent resident

See Lawful Permanent Resident.

Permanent Resident Alien

See Lawful Permanent Resident.

Permanent Resident Card (Form I-551)

Also known as a Green Card or alien registration card, this card is issued by USCIS to aliens as evidence of their lawful permanent resident status in the United States. For Form I-9, it is acceptable as proof of identity and employment authorization. Although some Permanent Resident Cards contain no expiration date, most are valid for 10 years. Cards held by individuals with conditional permanent resident status are valid for two years.

Person

A human being (does not include a non-human entity that is treated as a person for limited legal purposes, unless otherwise specified). This term is synonymous with “individual” when it is used to describe a human being. Note that this definition is different than the one Congress has provided for determining the meaning of federal statutes, according to which “person” includes “corporations, companies, associations, firms, partnerships, societies, and joint stock companies, as well as individuals,” unless the context indicates otherwise. See 1 U.S.C. 1.

Petitioner

This is a person who files an immigration petition or application.

Physical Address

The address where you physically reside.

Port of entry

Any location in the United States or its territories that is designated as a point of entry for aliens and U.S. citizens. All district offices and service centers are also considered ports, because they become locations of entry for aliens adjusting to immigrant status.

Practitioner

This is a person who is authorized to file immigration petitions or applications with USCIS on behalf of noncitizens.

Pre-inspection

This is the complete immigration inspection of airport passengers before departing a foreign country. These immigrants do not need another inspection when they arrive in the United States (however, nonimmigrant noncitizens must submit Form I-94).

Precedent decision

This is a published decision of the BIA or the AAO that is binding on all USCIS officers in the administration of the Immigration and Nationality Act (INA).

Preference System (Immigration Act of 1990)

The nine categories since fiscal year 1992 among which the family-sponsored and employment-based immigrant preference visas are distributed. The family-sponsored preferences are: 1) unmarried sons and daughters of U.S. citizens; 2) spouses, children, and unmarried sons and daughters of permanent resident aliens; 3) married sons and daughters of U.S. citizens; 4) brothers and sisters of U.S. citizens. The employment-based preferences are: 1) priority workers (persons of extraordinary ability, outstanding professors and researchers, and certain multinational executives and managers); 2) professionals with advanced degrees or aliens with exceptional ability; 3) skilled workers, professionals (without advanced degrees), and needed unskilled workers; 4) special immigrants; and 5) employment creation immigrants (investors).
 

Principal Designated School Official (PDSO)

An individual designated by the head of an Student and Exchange Visitor Program (SEVP)-approved school to have primary responsibility for students in that program and maintaining records in the Student and Exchange Visitor Information System (SEVIS).

Principal noncitizen

This is an noncitizen who applies for immigrant status and from whom another noncitizen may derive lawful status under immigration law or regulations (usually spouses and minor unmarried children).

Priority Date

The priority date determines when it’s a person’s turn to apply for an immigrant visa. In family immigration, the priority date is the date when a person files a petition at a DHS office or submitted to a U.S. Embassy or Consulate abroad. In employment immigration, the priority date may be the date the Department of Labor receives a labor certification application.

Pro Bono Program

This is a list of local organizations that provide free legal services, and is usually available at each local USCIS office.

For more information about finding legal services, please visit  uscis.gov/legaladvice.

Processing Times

These are an estimate of how long it will take to process your case from start to finish. Each case is different, so some cases may take longer than others to process. You can find our average processing times on our website. If you use your receipt number to check your case status, please remember that we will only research your case if it is beyond our current processing times.

Prosecutorial discretion

The legal authority to choose whether or not to take action against an individual for committing an offense.

Provisional waiver

Waiver for individuals who are otherwise inadmissible due to more than 180 days of unlawful presence in the United States, based on a showing of extreme hardship to certain U.S. citizen or lawful permanent resident family members, which allows the individual to return after departure for an immigrant visa interview at a U.S. embassy or consulate. For more information, go to the Provisional Unlawful Presence Waivers page.

Q

Qualified Representative

These are people who will provide free services. These representatives must know about immigration law and the rules of practice in court. Law school students and graduates, and people with good moral character who have a personal or professional affiliation with you (a relative, neighbor, clergy, co-worker, or friend) are all examples of qualified representatives.

R

Re-entry Permit

Permanent or conditional residents should apply for a re-entry permit if they will be outside the United States for one year or more. A valid re-entry permit allows you to apply for admission to the U.S. without having to get a returning resident visa from a U.S. Embassy or Consulate.

Receipt Number

The receipt number is a unique 13-character identifier that USCIS provides for each application or petition it receives. The agency uses it to identify and track its cases.

The receipt number consists of three letters-for example, EAC, WAC, LIN, SRC, NBC, MSC or IOE-and 10 numbers. You can find it on notices of action USCIS has sent you.

Recognized Organization

These are organizations that the Board of Immigration Appeals (BIA) recognizes. For an organization to be recognized, it must have enough knowledge and experience to provide services to immigrants. A recognized organization can charge or accept only very small fees for those services. For a list of these BIA-recognized organizations, visit justice.gov/eoir/recognition-accreditation-roster-reports.

Record of proceedings

The official file containing documents relating to an alien’s case.

Referral Date Confirmation

You must visit SSA or contact DHS about a Tentative Nonconfirmation (TNC) no later than this date.

Refugee

Generally, any person outside his or her country of nationality who is unable or unwilling to return to that country because of persecution or a well-founded fear of persecution based on the person’s race, religion, nationality, membership in a particular social group, or political opinion. For a legal definition of refugee, see section 101(a)(42) of the Immigration and Nationality Act (INA).

Refugee approvals

This is the number of refugees approved for admission to the United States during a fiscal year.

Refugee Travel Document

We issue refugee travel documents to people with refugee or asylum status and to lawful permanent residents who obtained their Green Cards based on their refugee or asylee status so they may re-enter the United States.

Refugee-parolee

This is a qualified applicant for conditional entry between February 1970 and April 1980, whose application for admission to the United States could not be approved because of inadequate numbers of seventh-preference visas. As a result, we allowed the applicant to enter the United States under the parole authority granted to the secretary of Homeland Security.

Registry date

These are noncitizens who have continuously resided in the United States since Jan. 1, 1972, and are:

Before the Immigration Reform and Control Act of 1986 amended the date, noncitizens had to have been in the country continuously since June 30, 1948, to qualify.

Regulations

Rules issued by an executive authority, such as a government department or agency in the executive branch, to carry out the intent of the law. Regulations issued by the federal government are first published in the Federal Register, then arranged in the Code of Federal Regulations (CFR). Immigration regulations issued by the Department of Homeland Security are codified in Title 8 CFR, Aliens and Nationality.

Reject (as compared to denial)

When USCIS determines that an immigration petition or application cannot be accepted for intake, processing and adjudication because it lacks a basic requirement (for example, a required fee or signature).

Remand

This means sending a case back to a lower court or tribunal to take an action ordered by a higher court or tribunal.

Removal

 The expulsion of an alien from the United States. This expulsion may be based on grounds of inadmissibility or deportability.

Remuneration

Anything of value given in exchange for labor or services, including food and lodging.

Request for Evidence (RFE)

We may send you a request for additional evidence if:

Resettlement

This is the permanent relocation of refugees in a place outside their country of origin to allow them to establish residence and become productive members of society there. Refugee resettlement is accomplished with the direct assistance of private voluntary agencies working with the Department of Health and Human Services Office of Refugee Resettlement.

Resident alien

This term applies to non-U.S. citizens currently residing in the United States. The term is applied in three different manners; please see Permanent resident, Conditional resident, Returning resident.

Responsible Officer (RO) or Alternate Responsible Officer (ARO)

An official authorized to issue Form DS-2019.

Returning resident

This is any lawful permanent resident who has been outside the United States and is returning to the U.S. It’s also defined as a “special immigrant.”

ROP

An abbreviation for Record of Proceedings.

S

Safe haven

This is a temporary refuge given to migrants who have fled their countries of origin to seek protection or relief from persecution or other hardships until they can return to their countries safely or, if necessary until they can obtain permanent relief from the conditions they fled.

Service centers

Service centers only adjudicate applications that individuals have mailed, filed electronically, or filed with a USCIS Lockbox. Service centers do not provide in-person services, conduct interviews, or receive walk-in applications or questions. USCIS has five service centers: California, Nebraska, Potomac, Texas, and Vermont.

Special agricultural workers

These are noncitizens who perform labor in perishable agricultural commodities for a specified period of time and were admitted for temporary and then permanent residence under a provision of the Immigration Reform and Control Act of 1986.

Special Immigrant Juveniles (SIJ) Status

Some children who are here in the U.S. without legal immigration status may need humanitarian protection because they have been abused, abandoned, or neglected by a parent. SIJ status is an immigration classification that may allow these vulnerable children to apply immediately for lawful permanent resident status, commonly known as having a Green Card.

Special immigrants

This refers to:

Special naturalization provisions

These provisions cover special classes of persons who may naturalize even though they do not meet all the general requirements for naturalization. Such special provisions allow:

Other classes of persons who may qualify for special consideration are former U.S. citizens, servicemen, seamen, and employees of organizations promoting U.S. interests abroad.

Special Situations

These are natural catastrophes and other extreme situations. In these cases, you may be eligible for extensions and changes of status, fee waivers, employment authorization, document replacement, and expedited processing.

Special Student Relief

Special Student Relief occurs when the secretary of Homeland Security suspends certain regulatory requirements for F 1 students from parts of the world that are experiencing an emergent circumstance, such as natural catastrophe; war and military conflicts; and national or international financial crises.

Specialty occupation

An occupation which requires theoretical and practical application of highly specialized knowledge in fields of human endeavor, including:

Architecture;

Engineering;

Mathematics;

Physical sciences;

Social sciences;

Medicine and health

Education;

Business specialties;

Accounting;

Law;

Theology; and

The arts.

Specialty occupations requires the attainment of a bachelor’s degree or higher in a specific specialty, or its equivalent, as a minimum for entry into the occupation in the United States.

Sponsor

In the immigration field, the term “sponsor” often means to bring to the United States or “petition for.” If you would like to sponsor a relative, please see the Family section of our website. If you would like to sponsor an employee, please see our How Do I Guides for Employers. If you would like to sponsor an overseas orphan, please our adoption brochure (PDF, 230.33 KB). If you are a refugee or an asylee and wish to sponsor a relative, please see our How Do I Guides for Refugees and Asylees webpage.

Another meaning of the term “sponsor” is a person who completes Form I-864, Affidavit of Support Under Section 213A of the Act. However, this type of sponsorship is not the first step in any immigration process. To be a sponsor and file Form I-864, the following conditions must already be met:

Sporadic

Occurring occasionally, once, irregularly, or in unplanned fashion.

Stateless

This means having no nationality.

Stowaway

This is an noncitizen coming to the United States secretly on an airplane or vessel without legal status of admission. They are subject to denial of formal admission and return to the point of embarkation by the transportation carrier.

Student and Exchange Visitor Information System (SEVIS)

A Department of Homeland Security database developed to collect information on the F, M and J visa holders.

Student and Exchange Visitor Information System (SEVIS) ID number

Unique identifier printed on each Form I-20 or Form DS-2019 in the top right corner, which consists of an alpha character (N) and up to 11 numbers.

Student and Exchange Visitor Program (SEVP)

A government program that collects, maintains and provides information that allows legitimate foreign students or exchange visitors to gain entry into the United States. SEVP uses Web-based technology, known as the Student and Exchange Visitor Information System (SEVIS), to track and monitor schools and programs, students, exchange visitors and their dependents throughout the duration of approved participation within the U.S. education system.

Subject to the numerical limit

These are categories of legal immigrants subject to annual limits under the provisions of the flexible numerical limit of 675,000 set by the Immigration Act of 1990. The largest categories are family-sponsored preferences, employment-based preferences, and diversity immigrants.

T

T Nonimmigrant Status (T Visa)

T nonimmigrant status provides immigration protection to victims of trafficking. The T visa allows victims to remain in the United States and help law enforcement authorities in the investigation or prosecution of human trafficking cases.

Temporary protected status (TPS)

The secretary of the Department of Homeland Security may designate a foreign country for TPS due to conditions in that temporarily prevent the country’s nationals from returning safely, or in certain circumstances, where the country is unable to handle the return of its nationals adequately.

We may grant TPS to eligible nationals of certain countries (or parts of countries), who are already in the United States. Eligible individuals without nationality who last lived in the designated country may also be granted TPS. The secretary may designate a country for TPS due to the following temporary conditions in the country: ongoing armed conflict (such as civil war); an environmental disaster (such as earthquake or hurricane); or other extraordinary and temporary conditions. Grants of TPS are initially made for periods of 6 to 18 months and may be extended.

Temporary resident

This is an noncitizen who seeks temporary entry to the United States for a specific purpose. They must have a permanent residence abroad (for most classes of admission) and qualify for the nonimmigrant classification they are seeking.

See nonimmigrant.

Temporary worker

This is an noncitizen coming to the United States to work for a temporary period of time. The Immigration Reform and Control Act of 1986 and the Immigration Act of 1990, as well as other legislation, revised existing classes and created new classes of nonimmigrant admission. For more information, see our Temporary Worker webpage.

Tentative Nonconfirmation (TNC)

A TNC from DHS or the Social Security Administration (SSA) means that the information your employer entered in E-Verify from your Form I-9, Employment Eligibility Verification, did not match records available to DHS or SSA. Getting a TNC case result does not necessarily mean that you are not authorized to work in the United States. 

Transit noncitizen

This is an noncitizen in immediate and continuous transit through the United States, with or without a visa, including:

Transit without visa

This is an noncitizen traveling without a nonimmigrant visa under section 233 of the INA. We admit them under agreements with a transportation line, which guarantees their immediate and continuous passage to a foreign destination.

See Transit alien.

Travel Documents

We issue four types of travel documents:
•    Advance parole;
•    Refugee travel document;
•    Re-entry permit; and
•    Carrier documentation. 

U

U Nonimmigrant Status (U Visa)

U nonimmigrant status provides immigration protection to crime victims who have suffered substantial mental or physical abuse as a result of the crime. The U visa allows victims to remain in the United States and help law enforcement authorities in the investigation or prosecution of the criminal activity.